MS & PHD STUDENTS

Poonam Sheth, PhD

Degree: 
PhD
Program: 
Pharmaceutical Sciences
Track: 
Pharmaceutics and Pharmacokinetics
Dissertation Title: 
“Theoretical and Experimental Behavior of Suspension Pressurized Metered Dose Inhalers”

Alumna
Year Graduated: 2014
Inhalation Research Scientist at Cirrus Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

Academic & Professional Updates
I am currently an inhalation research scientist at Cirrus Pharmaceuticals, Inc., in Morrisville, NC, which is a contract research organization. I am responsible for managing projects or designing and executing various studies to support our clients’ projects, and training or supervision of junior personnel. My department offers a variety of product development services for preclinical and clinical/late-stage developmental for a variety of dosage forms, including pressurized metered dose inhalers, dry powder inhalers, nebulizer solution and suspensions, nasal sprays, and other novel delivery systems. I would highly recommend taking the opportunity to gain as much experience as possible from the faculty in your committee. Each professor has much knowledge and wisdom to offer, which I found to be invaluable. My favorite memory of being at the College of Pharmacy was taking a coffee break mid-afternoon with everyone in the department and learning more from everyone in the department.

Honors & Achievements
1. Graduate Track Awards: Academic Excellence, 2011-12.
2. Joseph B. Ryan Memorial Award, 2012-13.
3. Graduate Track Awards: Outstanding Research, 2014-15.

Publications
1. Sheth P., Stein S. W., Myrdal P. B. Factors influencing aerodynamic particle size distribution of suspension pressurized metered dose inhalers. AAPS PharmSciTech. 2014 (submitted).
2. Sheth P., Fazel M., Grimes M. R., Stein S. W., Myrdal P. B. Flow rate effects on differential throat deposition for pMDIs with USP inlet and Alberta Idealized Throat. Respiratory Drug Delivery. 2014; 3:625-630.
3. Sheth P., Fazel M., Stein S. W., Myrdal P. B. Formulation effects on differential throat deposition for pMDIs with USP inlet and Alberta Idealized Throat. Respiratory Drug Delivery. 2014; 3:631-636.
4. Sheth P., Bertsch M. D., Knapp C. L., Myrdal P. B. In vitro evaluation of nonconventional pMDI accessory devices with considerations for prescribing accessory devices. Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. 2013; 113(1): 55-62.
5. Myrdal P. B., Sheth P., Stein S. W. Advances in metered dose inhaler technology: Formulation development. AAPS PharmSciTech. 2014;15(2):434-455.
6. Stein S. W., Sheth P., Hodson P. D., Myrdal P. B. Advances in metered dose inhaler technology: Hardware development. AAPS PharmSciTech. 2014;15(2):326-338.
7. Sheth P., Stein S. W., Myrdal P. B. The influence of initial atomized droplet size on residual particle size from pressurized metered dose inhalers. International Journal of Pharmaceutics. 2013; 455(1-2):57-65.
8. Stein S. W., Sheth P., Myrdal P. B. A model for predicting size distributions delivered from pMDIs with suspended drug. International Journal of Pharmaceutics. 2012; 422(1-2):101-115.
9. Sheth P., and Myrdal P. B. “Polymers for Pulmonary Drug Delivery,” Chapter in Controlled Release Science and Technology: Pulmonary Delivery, Edited by H. Smyth and A. Hickey, Controlled Release Society Press, St. Paul, MN. 2011.
10. Sheth P., and Myrdal P. B. “Excipients Utilized for Modifying Pulmonary Drug Release,” Chapter in Controlled Release Science and Technology: Pulmonary Delivery, Edited by H. Smyth and A. Hickey, Controlled Release Society Press, St. Paul, MN. 2011.
11. Stein S. W., Sheth P., Karayiannis C., Chiou H., and Myrdal P. B. Modeling MDI delivery: A priori predictions, empirical models and experiments. Respiratory Drug Delivery. 2010;1:353-364.
Originally posted: March 27, 2015
Last updated: October 8, 2015
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